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What's Real

What I've heard

I will have to leave my child or my children if I seek treatment. I will have to live at a facility to get treatment.

What's Real

There are options that allow you to take your children with you. And not all treatment requires you to stay at a facility. In fact, outpatient treatment is more common. Outpatient treatment allows you to live at home and attend treatment during the day or during the evenings. Depending on the amount of care you need to stop using, the amount of daily treatment could take one or two hours or last all day.

What I've heard

My child or children will be taken from me if I seek treatment.

What's Real

While it is uncommon for women who seek treatment, there are cases where social services will remove a child if they have reason to believe there is a risk of abuse or neglect. However, if you are in treatment you are demonstrating that you are trying to make a better life for yourself and your children.

What I've heard

If I go to treatment or decide to leave treatment, I will be reported to social services. A case will be opened on me and I will be in “the system.”

What's Real

You cannot be reported to child protective services simply for participating in treatment or leaving treatment if you are not already involved in that system. A treatment provider will only communicate with child protective services for two reasons: if your children are at risk of being abused or neglected, or if you already have a caseworker AND have other children in your home.

What I've heard

I can't afford treatment; it will be too expensive.

What's Real

Colorado’s publicly funded women's treatment programs accept Medicaid and work out flexible payment plans based on your ability to pay if you are not on Medicaid to make sure the cost of treatment is never a barrier between you and your health.

What I've heard

I will be kicked out of treatment if I relapse or struggle to make progress.

What's Real

You will NEVER be kicked out if you are sincere about getting better. Relapses and struggles are a sign of your addiction illness. Treatment is about finding a path to successfully overcome an addiction. That process may take several tries. If needed, your treatment may change to help you move forward.

What I've heard

I need to detox for the health of my baby.

What's Real

If a woman is addicted, particularly to opiates like heroin, certain detox methods during pregnancy can be very risky for the fetus. A physician or provider can give you medication to help prevent withdrawal so that your fetus can develop as normally as possible.

What I've heard

Jail is better than treatment.

What's Real

For some women, jail feels more familiar than treatment. Going to a new place, with new rules and different faces, can be scary. But treatment is intended to be a safe, low-stress environment to help you have the healthiest pregnancy, life and recovery possible. We think the food is better, too!

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